Landscape boards commit to First Nations partnerships

Historic: Signing the new agreement are Landscape Board representatives, by South Australias Landscape Board Chairs Di Davidson (Murraylands and Riverland  back left), Ross Sawers (South Australian Arid Lands), Andrew Heinrich (Kangaroo Island), Chris Daniels (Green Adelaide), Mark Whitfield (Eyre Peninsula), Parry Agius (Alinytjara Wilurara  front left), Caroline Schaefer (Northern and Yorke), David Greenhough (Hills and Fleurieu) and Penny Schulz (Limestone Coast). Photo: Supplied.
Historic: Signing the new agreement are Landscape Board representatives, by South Australias Landscape Board Chairs Di Davidson (Murraylands and Riverland back left), Ross Sawers (South Australian Arid Lands), Andrew Heinrich (Kangaroo Island), Chris Daniels (Green Adelaide), Mark Whitfield (Eyre Peninsula), Parry Agius (Alinytjara Wilurara front left), Caroline Schaefer (Northern and Yorke), David Greenhough (Hills and Fleurieu) and Penny Schulz (Limestone Coast). Photo: Supplied.

An important strategy to strengthen partnerships between the state's nine landscape boards and First Nations has been delivered.

The formal Statement of Commitment signed by all nine chairpersons highlights collaboration and reconcilliation with First Nations people on landscape priorities across South Australia.

Twelve commitments, developed in consultation with the First Nations Coordinating Committee and SA Native Title Services, will help the boards to use Indigenous expertise when delivering landscape plans.

Limestone Coast Landscape Board Chair Penny Schulz was delighted to endorse the statewide Statement of Commitment.

"In our own Limestone Coast Regional Landscape Plan and Annual Business Plan we declared our intent to continue to walk with First Nations in the sustainable management of our landscape and grow these relationships through new opportunities," she said.

"First Nations people are benefitting from these partnerships by gaining employment to undertake weed control services, for example, and bringing cultural knowledge to burning activities in our region," she said.

"By having conversations and working together, our landscapes benefit.

"We are excited about growing our land management knowledge and practices together."

Boards collective chair David Greenhough said the commitments would allow for better engagement in landscape management.

"We have committed to learn from and with our First Nations partners, actively seek their ideas and support their aspirations," he said.

"Through signing this statement each board is committing to build stronger relationships with Aboriginal people and organisations in SA, and supporting their greater economic prosperity and wellbeing.

Ultimately, we are committed to looking after our land, water and people together.

"We have worked with First Nations authorities to ensure the statement genuinely honours the intent of reconciliation and the 'Closing the Gap' principles, and reflects our pledge to deliver."