Thousands are still abandoning the cities for the country

SEE YA: The movement of people from city to country has seen regional houses snapped up and pressure to quickly build more estates.
SEE YA: The movement of people from city to country has seen regional houses snapped up and pressure to quickly build more estates.

There's still no signs the exodus of city-folk to the country is slowing.

Only the lack of houses to buy or rent in the regions is expected to slow this movement of people from city to country.

Escaping from pandemic lockdowns in the cities for a better life in the bush and being able to work from home is still fuelling the trend.

This week's Australian Bureau of Statistics report show a record 11,800 people left the nation's capital cities in the three months to the end of March.

Sydney and Melbourne fared the worst.

It was the largest net loss since the records began, beating the record only set late last year.

With national borders closed, the focus has been on internal migration, and it appears Queensland is gaining the most people from other states.

IN OTHER NEWS:

Victoria did not gain people from any state or territory and lost most to Queensland in those three months to the end of March (-2900).

In net terms, Queensland gained the most people from New South Wales (+3800) and lost only to Western Australia (-250).

Melbourne:

There was a net loss of 8300 people for Greater Melbourne in the quarter, compared with 8500 in the previous quarter.

Melbourne had net losses of 4800 people to the rest of the state and 3400 interstate.

Brisbane:

There was a net gain of 3300 people for Greater Brisbane, compared with 4800 in the previous quarter.

Brisbane had net gains of 710 people from the rest of the state and 2600 interstate.

Adelaide:

In net terms, South Australia gained the most people from Victoria (+380) and lost most to Queensland (-270).

There was a net gain of 60 people for Greater Adelaide in the quarter, compared with a net loss of 250 in the previous quarter.

Adelaide had a net loss of 320 people to the rest of the state, and a net gain of 380 from interstate, the first net interstate gain since September 2002.

Perth:

Western Australia gained the most people from New South Wales (+570).

There was a net gain of 1600 people for Greater Perth, compared with 1800 in the previous quarter.

Perth had net gains of 190 people from the rest of the state and 1400 interstate.

Sydney:

In net terms, New South Wales only gained people from Victoria (+880) and lost most to Queensland (-3800).

There was a net loss of 8200 people for Greater Sydney, compared with 9300 in the previous quarter.

Sydney had net losses of 5100 people to the rest of the state and 3100 interstate.

Hobart:

Tasmania gained the most people from NSW (+300) and lost most to South Australia (-90).

There was a net loss of 290 people for Greater Hobart, compared with 90 in the previous quarter.

Hobart had net losses of 150 people to the rest of the state and 140 interstate.

Darwin:

The Northern Territory gained the most people from Victoria (+150) and lost most to Queensland (-210).

There was a net loss of 140 people for Greater Darwin, compared with a net gain of 260 in the previous quarter.

Canberra:

In net terms, the Australian Capital Territory gained the most people from NSW (+290) and lost most to Queensland (-190).

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