Keith Area School students swap school books for boots and work shirts

DAIRY MAGIC: Students from Keith Area School's Year 8 agriculture class at Schmidt's Dairy at Mundulla. Photo: Keith Area School.
DAIRY MAGIC: Students from Keith Area School's Year 8 agriculture class at Schmidt's Dairy at Mundulla. Photo: Keith Area School.

Agriculture students from Keith Area School had an opportunity to pull on the boots and work shirts instead of school uniform last week.

The hands-on week saw students practice the art of shearing sheep, along with learning how dairy cows are milked.

Starting on Tuesday, the school's wether team picked up the shears and shore their mob of eight sheep as part of their preparations for the Royal Adelaide Show in September.

The students weren't alone when it came to shearing the sheep, they were fortunate to learn and hone their skills from some experienced locals.

"With the help of Ian Hunt, Catherine Warnest and Tamara Walter the team learnt how to drag sheep, shear, shirt and sort wool," the school said.

"It was a great experience for our students - a big shout out and thank you to our always kind volunteers; Ian, Catherine and Tam."

After a successful day of shearing their sheep, students from the school's Year 8 agriculture class visited Schmidt's Dairy at Mundulla.

Students were lucky enough to milk a heard of 300 cows, while also learning about the many things that need to be done to efficiently produce the product.

"Our students learnt how to bring the mob in, put cups on, clean teats, clean cups and return the mob to the paddock," the school said.

"Students worked in pairs teaching each other how to milk and cows and worked very efficiently to milk the entire heard and on schedule.

"Thank you to Brad, Casey, Everly and Macey for allowing our students to have this valuable experience."

Despite there being many students across the Tatiara district that live on farms and have these experiences each day, the ability to escape the classroom and undertake some hands-on work is highly beneficial.

The school's agriculture students will continue to prepare for the Royal Adelaide Show, with the school hoping to have some success.