Weeds may be gone but Bordertown Railway Station is still a 'safety hazard'

PROBLEMS: Regional rail advisor and advocate Gary Field said the removal of weeds at the Bordertown Railway Station may have improved the state of the station, but it has since revealed more serious problems.
PROBLEMS: Regional rail advisor and advocate Gary Field said the removal of weeds at the Bordertown Railway Station may have improved the state of the station, but it has since revealed more serious problems.

The past couple of months has seen numerous individuals speak out about the Bordertown Railway Station's poor condition.

After learning of complaints made in January, regional rail advisor and advocate Gary Field said the situation at the railway station has changed.

Mr Field believes that between January 13 and February 9 the overgrown and ugly weeds that greeted the town's visitors had been removed by an unknown individual or group.

The removal of the weeds may have improved the station's untidy state, but it has since revealed a much more serious problem.

"The railway station platform is now a safety risk to passengers of The Overland, the general public and any person carrying out maintenance duties," Mr Field said.

He believes the current condition of the platform could result in it collapsing onto rail tracks.

"The clearing of the weeds has revealed a number of cracks on the platform surface, some of which have been filled in with gravel," Mr Field said.

He said the platform's surface is heavily pockmarked, contains a pothole near the entrance of the waiting room, an uneven gap from a drain cover, and damaged coping stone at the platform edge.

The gaps between the coping edge and the platform surface is allowing rain to penetrate and weaken the platform wall, which could eventually result in the platform's collapse.

"To add to the problems, the only entrance is a pockmarked steep ramp which will become slippery after rain," Mr Field added.

"There is also the problem with the station road entrance, which was once bituminised but is now worn down to road base, creating a dust bowl in summer and a mud patch in winter."

With Bordertown being the first stop for passengers entering South Australia, many, including Tatiara District Council, are desperate to improve the poorly conditioned station.

Mr Field said he has notified the Department for Infrastructure and Transport (DIT) but has received no official response.

"I received favourable attention from a senior manager, but they have been promoted to a new section and the referral I was given has not to date responded to my request," he said.

"As the railway station is active, it is subject to an upgrade to conform to the Disability Discrimination Act, Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport, and the South Australian Disability Inclusion Act.

"The Bordertown Railway Station not only fails to conform to the requirement of the federal and state legislative acts, but foremost, is a safety hazard."