Bordertown residents reminded not to get lazy on QR code check-in

IMPORTANT: Commissioner of Police Grant Stevens said businesses are obligated to make sure that people coming into their premises check in.
IMPORTANT: Commissioner of Police Grant Stevens said businesses are obligated to make sure that people coming into their premises check in.

Before the average Bordertown resident goes into the supermarket to pick up a loaf of bread and a bottle of milk, they are met with a sheet of paper with a QR code.

While majority of residents have been more than happy to take a couple seconds out of their day to check-in, SA Police have reminded people to not get lazy when entering businesses.

Since the South Australian Government introduced the QR code check-in system late last year, people have had the onus put on them to willingly comply with the system, for the betterment of the state.

Commissioner of Police Grant Stevens said QR codes are critical in providing important information in contact tracing and will ensure businesses can remain open with the current level of restrictions.

"Businesses are obligated to make sure that people coming into their premises check in, there's also an obligation on the patron to check in at some point whilst they're visiting that business," he said.

Since QR codes commenced, there have been 6121 business compliance checks, resulting in 213 fines and cautions issued to persons and businesses for not complying with QR Code requirements.

This included five fines to businesses and 131 cautions, while 42 individuals have been fined and 35 cautioned.

A total of 61 fines have been issued to businesses, which includes a $5000 fine plus Victims of Crime Levy. A $1000 fine, plus Victims of Crime Levy, has been issued to 1009 individuals so far.

While businesses in Bordertown have done the right thing, it is up to customers to check-in every time they enter a business.

In December last year, Bordertown Bakery co-owner Jodie Mitchell said, even during the early stages of the system, there were some customers opting not to use the provided QR codes to check-in.

However, most people see the importance of the process.

"I reckon people have realised that it's better to scan when they enter then experience another period where the economy gets closed down," Mrs Mitchell said.

"They have also realised that losing a couple of seconds is a small price to pay to stay out of lockdown."

Despite it seeming fairly simple to quickly get your phone out and scan the QR code at the entrance of the business you're entering, it is easy to become lazy.

Multiple Bordertown businesses have experienced people who have either declined to check-in, or have explained they "will only be two seconds".

"It is important to remind the community and business owners that they are required to actively use the QR codes on every occasion," Commissioner Stevens said.

"They are an important part of our response to protect South Australians from the spread of COVID, by enhancing contact tracing in the event of an outbreak."