Bordertown Railway Station 'gives a poor reflection of town', councillor says

POOR LOOK: Cr Ken McInerney said the negative attention the station has received since the resumption of The Overland has put the entire town in a bad light.
POOR LOOK: Cr Ken McInerney said the negative attention the station has received since the resumption of The Overland has put the entire town in a bad light.

The Overland's return to the tracks on January 3 was a sight for sore eyes for a number of South Australian and Victorian train enthusiasts.

During the train service's first trip of the year, many passengers noticed that the Bordertown Railway Station was in far from pristine condition, resulting in Tatiara District Council having a discussion about the matter.

Council is not responsible for cleaning and maintaining the station, instead, that responsibility falls on the Department for Infrastructure and Transport.

At council's January meeting, Cr Ken McInerney suggested that council should consider sending a letter to Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Corey Wingard in the hope of resolving the issue.

Cr McInerney said the negative attention the station has received since the resumption of The Overland has put the entire town in a bad light.

"I don't like that people are passing judgement on the station and thinking that it's council's responsibility - it gives a poor reflection of the town," Cr McInerney said.

The Bordertown-based station is in desperate need of a face-lift, with a paint job required and the removal of weeds some of the many problems needing to be resolved.

Cr McInerney mentioned that pigeons have also got into the roof of the station, adding another problem to the seemingly long list.

Railway historian and author of The Overland - A Social History, Dr John Wilson said it was a "disgrace" that the station looks the way it currently does.

"I suggest that the DPTI buy a few cans of paint to brighten-up the Bordertown Railway Station - it's a disgrace that it looks the way it does," Dr Wilson said.

"If that is the first thing passengers see when they enter Bordertown, then it probably won't encourage people to stop there."

With Bordertown and Murray Bridge being the only two regional SA towns that The Overland stops at during its 828-kilometre route, poorly presented stations could potentially have an impact on tourism in the state.

Cr McInerney said writing a letter to Minister Wingard was the best way to resolve the issue. He also asked for the letter to be sent to Federal Member for Barker Tony Pasin and Member for MacKillop Nick McBride.

Minister Wingard's office has been contacted for comment.