Bordertown students enjoy agriculture excursion

NEW PATHWAY: Students from Bordertown High School had the opportunity to see what agricultural pathways they could choose to go down.
NEW PATHWAY: Students from Bordertown High School had the opportunity to see what agricultural pathways they could choose to go down.

Twenty-one students from Bordertown High School enjoyed a full day excursion visiting a number of agricultural based businesses and enterprises in Bordertown on July 4.

The trip is part of the ABC Heywire Youth Innovation Grant (Bridging Agriculture) which will be used to encourage long-term career opportunities in the agricultural sector for migrant and refugee youths.

The Bordertown Migrant Resource Centre (MRC) and Bordertown High School have been working collaboratively on the beneficial project.

Students had the opportunity to visit and learn about some of the many local agriculture businesses in Bordertown.

During the trip, they visited Wise Farm Machinery, Landmark, Wickham Flower, Grosser family farm and the shearing shed at Glengyle family farm.

MRC multicultural community services coordinator Tracey Grosser said many of the students expressed a greater understanding of the work experience and apprenticeship process as well as a better understanding of agricultural career pathways.

Most importantly, the students had "lots of fun" and learnt a lot out of the experience.

Mrs Grosser thanked the businesses who allowed the students to visit and said education is vital to promote agricultural pathways.

"Education is required to promote awareness and understanding of agricultural career pathways alongside opportunities to be exposed to the industry first hand," Mrs Grosser said.

"This excursion provided a great opportunity to see what is on offer in the Tatiara."

Mrs Grosser hopes the excursion will inspire new arrival students to choose an agricultural work experience pathway.

"The aim is more new arrival students will choose agricultural placements for work experience and consider Ag as a possible elective at school," Mrs Grosser said.

One comment from one of the students summed up the learning experience of the day, saying: "Farming in Australia is a bit different to farming in Afghanistan."