Volunteering with the SES

Back in 2015: Tony Cappelluti (third from left) presents a thank you cheque to Kingston SES members Tyson Baker (left), Tim Comey, Kym Wehl and Alan Stargatt.
Back in 2015: Tony Cappelluti (third from left) presents a thank you cheque to Kingston SES members Tyson Baker (left), Tim Comey, Kym Wehl and Alan Stargatt.

Whenever disasters happen, the Kingston SES team are on hand helping out – and all of them are volunteers. 

They respond to emergencies such as missing people or car accidents; everyone takes part in many important jobs but most people who work for the SES are volunteers. 

SES volunteers are involved with a lot of training, including first aid, storm damage training, with tarping and roof jobs and land search looking for missing people.

There is a lot of variety for SES volunteers to learn which is one of the great benefits of being in the SES.

They play an important role in the community and it is vital there's enough volunteers.

Tim Comey said it was great when people committed to spend their spare time helping out the SES team.

He said the time volunteered each month varies but it can be as much, or as little as you choose. He has been with the SES for 10 years helping out the community and assisting in emergency situations.

“The SES do a lot of things, the biggest thing with volunteering is the training, everyone who joins will take part in a lot of training,” he said.

“You learn a lot of skills and you will be prepared in many emergency situations, it is very rewarding.

“At the end of the day it is up to the individual as to how much time they can give.

“For example if I am not available I am not available and that is the biggest thing with volunteering, you donate how much time you can give.

“Unfortunately it is harder and harder to get more people to join and to find people with the time to volunteer.

“On our books we have 10 members for the Kingston SES crew, who are all highly committed.

“For anyone who is interested in joining the Kingston SES, the trainings take place on Tuesday nights.

“Training could be anything from learning about radios, map reading, first aid course or how to deal with a road crash, when you have to use the stretcher, certain knots you can and cannot use. Even experienced volunteers relearn things all the time.

”A few people are going in to get a truck licence, currently only three SES members have the licence so the sooner we can get more people with the truck licence the better it will be.

“We need more skippers to support maring searches in area to continue supporting the community. If we are involved with anything marine related and if those two people are not available when needed then the SES simply cannot be of assistance.

“All of the training is nationally recognised. The whole region is struggling with numbers, everyone is in the same boat.”

This story Volunteering with the SES first appeared on Coastal Leader.